YouTube Live stole one of Twitch’s best features and managed to improve raids

A few years ago, YouTube added live redirects as a way for creators to deliver live streams that ended up pointing viewers to another video on their own channel for premiere events, like BTS engaging fans. before showing a new music video. Now it has adjusted live redirects so that live streamers on the service can redirect their audience to another live stream when they disconnect. A first launch event for the film Top Gun: Maverick Wednesday will be one of the first big events to take advantage of the new addition.

On Twitch, this behavior is called a raid. On the one hand, it’s a good way to help grow viewership and find new content, but it’s also been a vehicle for harassment on the platform, as ‘hate raids’ allegedly target streamers. marginalized with abuse of hundreds of accounts at once.

YouTube Live Redirect Stream Example
Image: YouTube Support

YouTube has clearly taken note of the issues Twitch has struggled to contain and is rolling out live redirects with settings that could make bot-powered harassment something streamers don’t need to worry about so much.

On Twitch, by default, channels are set to allow raids from anyone, and while users can change this setting to only allow raids from “friends, teammates, and followed channels”, many don’t. not. However, from the outset, YouTube Live redirects can only point to channels that subscribe to the streamer or have explicitly added that channel to an allowed list. Additionally, only channels with more than 1,000 subscribers and no active community guidelines warnings can send a live redirect.

Now that the feature is live, we’ll be able to see how streamers are using it, but building default settings that give streamers one less thing to worry about should be a good start. YouTube previewed live redirects in a march video along with several other new features to come as it tries to convince creators that this is the platform they should be using instead of competitors like Twitch, Facebook or TikTok.

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