Whistleblower says YouTube REFUSED to remove Islamist hate preacher videos flagged by moderators

YouTube has consistently refused to remove racist and terrorist videos, a whistleblower says in the latest explosive testimony to shake up the tech giant.

The website failed to remove images calling Jews ‘pig-like’ and ‘agents of Satan’, the former moderator told the Jewish Chronicle.

Khaled Hassan, 31, also warned bosses of the Google-owned video-sharing platform to ignore the clips that inspired the Texas synagogue shooter.

YouTube said it was conducting an ongoing review, adding it was “committed” to making sure “this is not a place for those looking to do harm”.

Khaled Hassan (pictured), 31, also warned bosses of the Google-owned video-sharing platform about the ignored clips that inspired the Texas synagogue shooter

Three of the terrorist's friends this week admitted he became radicalized by watching Pakistani hate preacher Israr Ahmed (pictured) online

Three of the terrorist’s friends this week admitted he became radicalized by watching Pakistani hate preacher Israr Ahmed (pictured) online

A Rabbi and Three Hostages Held at Gunpoint by a British Terrorist… What Happened at the Texas Synagogue Siege?

In January, a rabbi and three worshipers were held at gunpoint during a service at the Congregation Beth Israel Synagogue in Colleyville, Texas.

One hostage was freed after six hours and the others escaped several hours later on January 15 before Akram, 44, was shot dead by an FBI SWAT team.

The body of the father-of-six was brought back to London before being taken to Blackburn for his funeral.

Akram (pictured), 44, was shot dead by an FBI SWAT team after the siege in Texas in January

Akram (pictured), 44, was shot dead by an FBI SWAT team after the siege in Texas in January

Akram’s family have called for an investigation into how he managed to get to the United States, despite concerns over his extremist views.

He had twice been referred to the ‘Prevent’ counter-terrorism program following the breakdown of his marriage and was investigated by MI5 in December 2020, but he was not considered a terrorist threat.

Akram is said to have been brought up in a “typically English” way, developing a love for beloved Sunday roasts, Blackburn Rovers and the sitcom Only Fools and Horses.

But after spending time in a Pakistani military school as a teenager and dropping out of business classes in Britain, he found himself embroiled in an Islamic sect throughout his twenties.

He held a rabbi and three worshipers at gunpoint during a service at the Congregation Beth Israel Synagogue in Colleyville (pictured)

He held a rabbi and three worshipers at gunpoint during a service at the Congregation Beth Israel Synagogue in Colleyville (pictured)

He is said to have once burned £60,000 in cash outside a mosque in a waterfall to represent giving up his old life and getting away from ‘dirty money’.

Akram, who once ran a drugstore chain, bought the gun he used in the street siege for $150 during his two weeks in the United States.

He has repeatedly railed against the Jewish community after taking his hostages and demanded the release of imprisoned terrorist Aafia Siddiqui – known as Lady Al-Qaeda for attempting to kill US service members in Afghanistan.

Akram made a final call to his brother Gulbar in which he cried out about “Jewish jews” and said he was “ready to die”.

Mr Hassan revealed that the website hosted and failed to remove anti-Semitic videos and even ignored moderators’ warnings to remove them.

He said Malik Faisal Akram, from Blackburn, UK, watched clips on the site before flying to Texas and taking four hostages at Beth Israel Synagogue on January 15.

Three of the terrorist’s friends this week admitted he became radicalized by watching Pakistani hate preacher Israr Ahmed online.

Mr Hassan said he was also ignored when he pointed out clips reveling in the killing of tour guide Eli Kay by Hamas’ Fadi Abu Shkaydam in Jerusalem on November 21.

He said bosses told him they couldn’t remove them because those who made the videos weren’t on YouTube’s banned list and no terrorist logos were displayed.

Mr Hassan, who worked to suppress extremist Arabic material on the site until January, told the Jewish Chronicle: “YouTube’s policy is a sham”.

The counter-terrorism expert added: “They claim they will remove content that glorifies terrorism and contains racist hate speech, but what they are doing behind the veil of corporate secrecy is very different”.

“They are shirking their legal and moral responsibilities. They tell users that their platform is safe.

“In fact, they allow people to become radicalized and reinforce claims that Jews are evil and rule the world.”

Mr Hassan said he reported dozens of videos of preacher Ahmad shouting anti-Semitism to his bosses.

He recounted how they included bile such as “New World Order, Jewish World Order”, that Jews “looked like pigs”, and that they were “the ultimate source of evil”.

Meanwhile, other videos cite the fabricated document of The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

Mr Hassan had worked for Leeds-based Crisp, which flags potentially harmful content for YouTube and Facebook.

The firm, which made more than £25.5million in 2020, compiled a report on October 28 highlighting that hateful videos put Jews at risk.

He warned that tech giant Ahmad’s hate speech was so extreme it was expected to cause ‘real-world damage’.

He said such content was likely to “foment religious and ethnic hatred and tension”, adding that YouTube would be poorly presented in the press if it did not remove it.

Mr Hassan said YouTube ignored the Crisp report and was then directed to an “informal action plan”, in which his work as a moderator was monitored.

He believed Crisp made the move because he flagged so many videos from the website that YouTube didn’t want to take down.

He also said he was told just before he quit that whenever he wanted to report something about the conflict in the Middle East, a Palestinian should check it out.

Mr Hassan claimed it was because he was perceived to have “problems with Palestinian stuff”. He was then transferred to a position where he did not verify videos and left the company.

YouTube’s rules state: “Hate speech is not allowed on YouTube”. We remove content that incites violence or hatred against individuals or groups.’

A spokesperson added: “Content promoting violence or hatred against the Jewish community is not permitted on YouTube.”

“Each quarter, we remove tens of thousands of videos that violate our hate speech policies.

“After review, we have closed 1 channel and removed 10 videos for violating our community guidelines.

“Our review is ongoing and we are committed to taking appropriate steps to ensure that YouTube is not a place for those who seek to harm.” Crisp has not commented yet.

Comments are closed.