mental health – 000111 http://000111.info/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 00:45:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://000111.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-35-120x120.png mental health – 000111 http://000111.info/ 32 32 Instagram and Snapchat sued over death of 11-year-old Connecticut girl https://000111.info/instagram-and-snapchat-sued-over-death-of-11-year-old-connecticut-girl/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 20:26:15 +0000 https://000111.info/instagram-and-snapchat-sued-over-death-of-11-year-old-connecticut-girl/ A Connecticut woman has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Snapchat and Meta, the parent company of Instagram and Facebook, claiming the social media giants have not done enough to protect her daughter from “harmful content and abusive” before his suicide. The 11-year-old died last July after struggling for two years with “extreme addiction” to […]]]>

A Connecticut woman has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Snapchat and Meta, the parent company of Instagram and Facebook, claiming the social media giants have not done enough to protect her daughter from “harmful content and abusive” before his suicide.

The 11-year-old died last July after struggling for two years with “extreme addiction” to Instagram and Snapchat, according to the lawsuit in federal court in San Francisco. The mother’s lawsuit was brought by the Social Media Victims Law Center, a group founded last year that seeks to hold social media companies accountable.


Hearst Connecticut Media Group withholds the family name because the daughter was underage.

“It’s not a matter of opinion. Internal documents and testimony from a former employee before Congress reveal that Meta Platforms was fully aware of the flaws and addictive properties of its social media platforms and failed to adequately design its products to protect underage users against damages,” Matthew Bergman, founder of the center and an attorney representing the mother in the suit, said in a statement.

In his statement, Bergman said “no protections are in place on Snapchat” and that the girl’s death “is a direct result of the inaction and deliberate addictive design of these social media platforms to addressing vulnerable children”.

Meta did not immediately respond Friday to a message seeking comment.

A Snapchat spokesperson said in a statement that the company was “devastated” by the news of the girl’s death, and “our thoughts are with her family.”

“While we cannot comment on specifics of active litigation, nothing is more important to us than the well-being of our community,” the company’s statement read. The spokesperson also pointed out that the app does not include “some of the public pressure and social comparison features of traditional social media platforms” and “intentionally” makes it harder for strangers to connect with younger users. .

“We are working closely with many mental health organizations to provide integrated tools and resources to Snapchatters as part of our ongoing work to keep our community safe,” the spokesperson said.

The lawsuit comes as social media companies have come under intense scrutiny of their practices by lawmakers, after internal Facebook documents were leaked by a former employee and reported by The Wall Street Journal .

The Connecticut mother’s complaint asks that damages be specified in a jury trial. He is also seeking a court order against the two social media companies “to end the harmful conduct alleged herein” and “remedy the unreasonably dangerous algorithms of their social media products.”

The lawsuit also asks the courts to order the companies to “provide warnings to underage users and their parents that the defendants’ social media products are addictive and pose a clear and present danger to unsuspecting minors.”

The lawsuit also claims the apps “do not allow for parental controls,” limiting the mother’s ability to monitor her daughter’s social media usage and requiring her to “physically confiscate” the daughter’s devices. According to the lawsuit, this caused the girl to “run off to access her social media accounts on other devices.”

In the months leading up to her death, the girl “experienced severe sleep deprivation which was caused and aggravated by her addiction to Instagram and Snapchat, and the constant stream of 24-hour notifications and alerts.” , says the lawsuit.

If you or someone you know is struggling with suicidal thoughts, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255.

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Lessons Learned by a Pharmacy Student on Instagram https://000111.info/lessons-learned-by-a-pharmacy-student-on-instagram/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 18:05:21 +0000 https://000111.info/lessons-learned-by-a-pharmacy-student-on-instagram/ [ad_1] Pharmacy students should consider the main benefits and risks when applying to an Instagram account for professional pharmacy purposes. In 2019, an article in the Journal of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy titled “To Twitter or not to Tweet?” An introduction to social media for pharmacists, ”encouraged pharmacists to engage professionally on social […]]]>


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Pharmacy students should consider the main benefits and risks when applying to an Instagram account for professional pharmacy purposes.

In 2019, an article in the Journal of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy titled “To Twitter or not to Tweet?” An introduction to social media for pharmacists, ”encouraged pharmacists to engage professionally on social media, although many pharmacists historically avoid it for such purposes.1 With the article published 1 year after creating my OVERxDOSE pharmacy podcast (pronounced “overdose”), I had just created a corresponding Instagram account (@overxdose), so I was interested in the article’s post.2

Even today, many pharmacy students continue to primarily use LinkedIn, Facebook and YouTube for their professional development and networking.3 However, there are still some key benefits and risks for pharmacy students to consider when approaching an Instagram account for professional pharmacy purposes.

Main advantages of an Instagram account

Social networking of pharmacists

One of the main benefits that an Instagram account can offer a pharmacist is increased networking capacity. Using my own account, I was able to communicate with pharmacists across the country during the COVID-19 pandemic without ever meeting them physically while attending a conference or professional event.

When I first ventured out to Instagram, I started out following popular drugstore accounts, such as @ rx.radio and @corconsultrx. By directing them to messages and asking for podcasting tips, I built strong mentoring relationships, and their professional advice has helped me continue to be successful on social media.

Plus, by creating my own pharmacy content and frequently interacting with other pharmacy accounts, the algorithm started to do the networking for me. Today, Instagram continues to suggest new pharmacy accounts for me to follow as I create Instagram accounts, expanding my professional network effortlessly.

Classroom learning supplement

In a 2015 meta-analysis, Facebook was the only social media used as an educational tool in pharmacy.4 However, other health professions commonly use Instagram as a resource to enhance student learning, quiz-type practice questions. being the type of content by subscribers.5.6

I noticed a similar trend when I created multiple choice style questions based on patient assessment content on my account (Figure 1). Creating questions improved my understanding of the material while also giving classmates self-assessment material that better prepared us for the exam.

Stay up to date on new technologies

With online news consumption in the United States at an all time high, more and more people are preferring news platforms on their mobile devices to desktop computers. While browsing the news on their phones, mobile users are also likely to turn to social media, as mobile users spend around 89% of their device’s time on social media; This makes social media the fastest way to reach a targeted audience.7-9

By following Instagram, I discovered emerging technologies and innovations that are revolutionizing the practice of pharmacy. For example, using my Instagram account, I learned about the advancements in telehealth and the digitalization of drug therapy management, the development of an automatic pill dispenser, and other technological solutions aimed at improving adherence. treatment, as well as the latest medication information.

A creative outlet and a professional identity

Social media also offers professionals an outlet for creative expression and identity development.ten Since pharmacy students are expected to develop their professional identity as they progress in their studies and in their careers, Instagram has been my creative medium as it combines my interests in storytelling and humor with my love of pharmacy.

With Instagram, I can not only connect with others who have the same passions, but also provide an example of professional development on social media for future pharmacists who are still working to find their own voice.

Main risks for an Instagram Account

Content may be considered unprofessional

Unprofessional posting has had professional consequences ranging from warning to expulsion and even dismissal.11 Studies have shown that medical students post more unprofessional content and observe unprofessional content from their peers more frequently than faculty.12.13

My first posts on my account were pharmacy memes that some of my peers considered unprofessional. However, being open to constructive criticism from my peers and my dean, I learned from my mistakes, and adapted what I posted to better reflect the professional image and message I wanted to convey. A big risk of social media is advertising, but it is also its strength.

However, pharmacy students need to be aware of these risks while balancing the ability to be a voice for the profession and present themselves as they want their employers and patients to see them. The answer, in my opinion, is not to stay silent on social media, but rather to be determined.

Distracted learning

Pharmacy students’ academic performance was found to correlate with time management, and pharmacy students reported that their phones could be a distraction that could negatively impact their academic performance.12.13

Often times, a short study break to create social media content or browse my feed could turn into hours of not studying, which made me feel less prepared for exams. Pharmacy students will need to find a balance, which is true for all creative outlets.

Negative impacts on mental health

Following strangers on social media can lead to social comparisons which can also negatively impact well-being.14 Specifically, research has shown that increased Instagram use may be partially associated with greater depressive symptoms. As I followed successful pharmacists, I experienced my own mental well-being by seeing their tremendous accomplishments and comparing them to my own.

However, the results of another study showed that following fewer strangers on Instagram was associated with weaker depressive symptoms. As I got to know pharmacists better, they no longer felt like strangers and I felt my mental health improved as a result.

Instagram pearls for pharmacy students

1. Follow other accounts for ideas

Pharmacy students who want to create an Instagram account don’t have to reinvent the wheel. For example, viewing other Instagram accounts featured on popular drugstore posting accounts such as @pharmacistsofig, @talktoyourpharmacien, @pharmacisthub, @pharmacistsincharge is a great place to start. Some accounts and their specific pharmaceutical content are presented in Table 1.

2. Pause before posting

Pharmacy students should check their school’s social media and professionalism policies and determine how their content can be viewed by an employer before posting it. If there is even a slight chance that it violates a policy or could be considered unprofessional, it is best not to post the content. On social media, nothing is truly anonymous, forcing people to remain responsible for their posts.

3. Use models

Using free software like Canva, pharmacy students can create or choose pre-designed templates and schedule their posts. Consistent use of the same template and the same post schedule saves time and creates a more cohesive and professional Instagram account.

As new social media platforms are created and more research is conducted on the topic, I hope pharmacy schools, current pharmacists, and pharmacy students see Instagram as a valuable tool that showcases the potential for expanding opportunities within the pharmacy profession.

The references

  1. Kukreja P, Sheehan AH, Riggins J. Use of social media by pharmacy preceptors. Am J Pharm Educ. 2011; 75 (9). doi: 10.5688 / ajpe759176
  2. Dixon DL, Reed BN. To tweet or not to tweet? A social media primer for pharmacists. JACCP J Am Coll Clin Pharm. 2019; 2 (5): 554-562. doi: 10.1002 / jac5.1120
  3. Jeminiwa R, Shamsuddin F, Clauson KA, et al. Personal and professional use of social media by pharmacy students. Curr Pharm Teaching Learning. 2021; 13 (6): 599-607. doi: 10.1016 / j.cptl.2021.01.043
  4. Benetoli A, Chen TF, Aslani P. The use of social media in pharmacy practice and education. Res Soc Adm Pharm. 2015; 11 (1): 1-46. doi: 10.1016 / j.sapharm.2014.04.002
  5. Nguyen VH, Lyden ER, Yoachim SD. Using Instagram as a tool to improve anatomy learning at two American dental schools. J Dent Educ. 2021; 85 (9): 1525-1535. doi: 10.1002 / jdd.12631
  6. Carman KL, Minns A, Garber S, et al. ObGyn Delivered: Social Media Serving the Learning Needs of Medical Students. Med Sci Educ. 2021; 31 (2): 827-836. doi: 10.1007 / s40670-021-01226-w
  7. Gottfried J, Shearer E. The use of online news by Americans is similar to the use of television news. Pew Research Center. September 7, 2017. Accessed October 21, 2021. https://internet.psych.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/532-Master/532-UnitPages/Unit-05/Gottfried_PewResearch_2017.pdf
  8. Walker M. Americans prefer mobile devices to desktops and laptops for obtaining information. Pew Research Center. Accessed October 1, 2021. https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2019/11/19/americans-favor-mobile-devices-over-desktops-and-laptops-for-getting-news/
  9. Keib K, Wojdynski BW, Espina C, et al. Living at Mobile Speed: How Users Rate Social Media News Posts on Smartphones. Common Res. Posted online May 28, 2021: 00936502211018542. doi: 10.1177 / 00936502211018542
  10. Gündüz U. The effect of social media on identity building | Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences. Published online August 2, 2020. Accessed September 29, 2021. https://www.richtmann.org/journal/index.php/mjss/article/view/10062
  11. Cain J, Fink JL. Legal and ethical issues regarding social media and pharmacy education. Am J Pharm Educ. 2010; 74 (10): 184.
  12. Sansgiry SS, Bhosle M, Sail K. Factors that affect the academic performance of pharmacy students. Am J Pharm Educ. 2006; 70 (5): 104.
  13. Aust LA, Bockman SA, Hermansen-Kobulnicky CJ. One click: pilot study on the perceived academic impact of screen time among pharmacy students. Curr Pharm Teaching Learning. 2019; 11 (6): 565-570. doi: 10.1016 / j.cptl.2019.02.019
  14. Lup K, Trub L, Rosenthal L. Instagram #Instasad ?: Exploring associations between Instagram use, depressive symptoms, negative social comparison, and strangers being followed. Cyberpsychology Behav Soc Netw. 2015; 18 (5): 247-252. doi: 10.1089 / cyber.2014.0560


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72% of US users don’t trust Facebook, poll finds https://000111.info/72-of-us-users-dont-trust-facebook-poll-finds/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 12:18:43 +0000 https://000111.info/72-of-us-users-dont-trust-facebook-poll-finds/ [ad_1] This one definitely falls under “No Sh * t Sherlock!” Category. According to a Washington Post-Schar School survey, the majority of Americans don’t trust any of the big social media companies like Meta, the company that owns Facebook and Instagram, but are torn because they still want to access their products and use them. […]]]>


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This one definitely falls under “No Sh * t Sherlock!” Category. According to a Washington Post-Schar School survey, the majority of Americans don’t trust any of the big social media companies like Meta, the company that owns Facebook and Instagram, but are torn because they still want to access their products and use them. And services.

It’s one of the few things Americans can agree on: They don’t trust big tech companies with their data. From Alexa to Google, social media platforms like Instagram and Facebook, and private messaging like Whatsapp, 64% think the government should do more to rule over tech companies.

A majority of those surveyed feel that they do not have enough say in the information they give to the companies that operate the platforms. They are in fact taken hostage. It’s practically impossible these days to function completely without some sort of interaction of these services and applications, and from running small businesses to keeping in touch with loved ones, the big tech giants seem to have looked at us all. barrel, with few alternatives.

The survey results tell us that 72% of Americans are suspicious of Facebook, 60% are suspicious of TikTok and Instagram, while other companies such as Microsoft, Google, Apple, YouTube and Amazon are hovering above the 50% level of mistrust. This is not particularly surprising, given the data leaks and news of the past two years. But it’s interesting that only 10% of people think Facebook has a positive effect on society as a whole. It is quite overwhelming.

Plus, 70% of Americans think their devices listen to them and listen to them when they’re not invited. It sounds a bit of a conspiracy theorist, but there are times when you tell someone about a particular topic, and then you start getting ads for that exact thing when it was just a question. face to face conversation without Googling or online mentions involved. It sometimes makes you think.

In another interesting development after the publication of the results of this survey, I received a questionnaire on my own personal Instagram feed from Meta, asking the same questions. Obviously, the company is sufficiently concerned with the outcome to conduct its own identical investigation.

Ultimately, most Americans (64%) think the government should be doing more to keep these businesses under control. In 2012, they were asked the same question when only 38% of the population wanted more government regulation. This is a significant increase and it indicates a sharp increase in dissatisfaction.

Personally, I don’t see an increase in government regulation becoming a thing in the near future, at least in the United States. These companies carry tremendous clout and actually keep us addicted to their products in one way or another. What then can we do if we have this love-hate relationship with big tech and avoiding it altogether is not practical or really an option?

A few ideas: take regular breaks from your online consumption, and watch the time you spend on each platform. There is probably one that sucks at one point more than another. Try to stick to specific durations or time of day when allowing yourself to use the Platforms. If you have to use them for work, get the job done, then get out right away without getting sucked into the rabbit hole. Easier said than done, I know!

It is also important to monitor how you feel after spending time there. If you’re feeling down, stressed, or angry, it’s probably time to take a step back and reassess your use. This is doubly important for teens, so if you have young adults in your care, try to help them set boundaries around their activities and use online. We’ve seen that social media platforms can have a negative effect on mental health, so we shouldn’t dismiss this, especially when it comes to teenagers.

What do you think of big tech companies and social media giants?

[Via Washington Post]

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Instagram gives parents tips to keep their kids safe online https://000111.info/instagram-gives-parents-tips-to-keep-their-kids-safe-online/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 13:33:00 +0000 https://000111.info/instagram-gives-parents-tips-to-keep-their-kids-safe-online/ [ad_1] Dec 1 2021 8:33 am EST Instagram gives parents tips to keep their kids safe online Social media is tricky, but Instagram tries to help parents keep track of how their kids are using the app. Menlo Park, CA – Teens are often more adept at using social media than their parents, but that […]]]>


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Instagram gives parents tips to keep their kids safe online

Social media is tricky, but Instagram tries to help parents keep track of how their kids are using the app.

Menlo Park, CA – Teens are often more adept at using social media than their parents, but that shouldn’t mean parents can’t understand what their kids are doing on social media.

Instagram has new suggestions for parents who want to keep their kids safe on social media. © Collage: Instagram, 123RF / maxkabakov

That’s why Instagram gives parents and guardians clear advice on how to make sure their kids are using the platform safely. The advice is likely also directed at parents whose concerns have been raised by recent headlines about Instagram’s impact on mental health.

New guidelines after then-parent company Facebook came under scrutiny when a whistleblower disclosed information showing the company was dismissing internal concerns about the psychological damage Instagram was causing to teens.

The effort to make Instagram safer for teens comes after company whistleblower Frances Haugen accused the company in October of dismissing internal concerns that Instagram was exacerbating women’s body image issues. one in three young girls and even triggered suicidal thoughts in some adolescents.

Meta ordered UK competition watchdog to sell Giphy!
Facebook
Meta ordered UK competition watchdog to sell Giphy!

Allegations made by Haugen, a former Facebook executive, reinforced the case of criticism of Facebook in the US Congress pushing for the company’s dissolution.

Instagram's parent company, Facebook / Meta, could definitely use some guidelines ...

Instagram’s parent company, Facebook / Meta, could definitely use some guidelines … © IMAGO / ZUMA Wire

Instagram is now showing parents what exactly they need to do to make the platform safer for their children. Here are some of the most important parameters suggested by the company.

If you don’t want your child’s content to be visible to everyone on or off Instagram, you should check the privacy settings with your child.

There, a public account can be turned into a private account. This means that anything they post will only be shared with subscribers. For minors registering for the first time on Instagram, the setting is automatically set to “private”.

You and your child can block anyone you don’t want to see or be approached by on Instagram. To do this, click on the profile of the contact you want to block and then click on the three dots at the top right.

All new accounts created by a blocked user can also be blocked. Blocks can also be deleted again in the settings. The user you block will not be notified of these actions.

Under “Your Activity” in your own profile, you can see how much time your child spends on Instagram on average each day. If you have agreed on a certain time of use with your child, you can set up a daily reminder in the same place as soon as the agreed time is reached.

Facebook researchers said that for many teens – especially girls – Instagram increases dissatisfaction with their own bodies, which in turn has a impact on their mental health.


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Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen to testify again before Congress https://000111.info/facebook-whistleblower-frances-haugen-to-testify-again-before-congress/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 08:43:23 +0000 https://000111.info/facebook-whistleblower-frances-haugen-to-testify-again-before-congress/ [ad_1] Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen will testify a second time before Congress on Wednesday to discuss possible legislative changes to the technology’s controversial legal liability shield – Section 230, US House Democrats said. House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Communications and Technology to Hold Next Hearing to Discuss What Democrats Call “Targeted Reforms” to Section […]]]>


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Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen will testify a second time before Congress on Wednesday to discuss possible legislative changes to the technology’s controversial legal liability shield – Section 230, US House Democrats said.

House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Communications and Technology to Hold Next Hearing to Discuss What Democrats Call “Targeted Reforms” to Section 230, Reports The edge.

Several committee members have already introduced bills that would create exceptions in the law that would make big tech companies like Facebook and Google legally responsible for algorithms that amplify content that leads to offline violence.

Haugen will testify alongside Color of Change chairman Rashad Robinson, according to House Democrats on Monday.

Republicans are also expected to propose a witness at the hearing. A second panel will include other expert witnesses from organizations such as Free Press Action and the Cyber ​​Civil Rights Initiative.

Haugen testified before the Senate Trade Committee in October shortly after leaking a cache of internal Facebook reports to the Wall Street Journal.

Reports have revealed several alarming policy and moderation failures on Facebook, but lawmakers have focused more intensely on documents regarding Instagram’s impacts on the mental health of young users.

These reports led the committee to hold additional hearings with representatives from other popular social platforms such as Snapchat, TikTok, and YouTube.

(With IANS entries)

Posted on: Tuesday November 30, 2021 2:13 PM IST

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Instagram’s downward spiral | Webster Kirkwood Times https://000111.info/instagrams-downward-spiral-webster-kirkwood-times/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://000111.info/instagrams-downward-spiral-webster-kirkwood-times/ [ad_1] | photo by Annie George of The Kirkwood Call Kirkwood High School senior Edie Wheeler sits on her bed amid the COVID-19 lockdown, scrolling through her phone. She sees videos of people exercising and doing two week abdominal challenges while she sits and trying to relax for those long months. It’s no surprise that […]]]>


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| photo by Annie George of The Kirkwood Call


Kirkwood High School senior Edie Wheeler sits on her bed amid the COVID-19 lockdown, scrolling through her phone.

She sees videos of people exercising and doing two week abdominal challenges while she sits and trying to relax for those long months. It’s no surprise that she soon feels like she’s lazy and not doing enough. She begins to compare her body and her own productivity to those she sees on the internet, which leads to a downward spiral of negativity.

“I saw people on social media doing Chloe Ting challenges and ‘Watch me try to lose weight in my 40s’ videos, and so I started doing all these workouts,” he said. said Wheeler. “Everyone was losing weight and eating healthy, so … I stopped eating.”

Unfortunately, Wheeler’s story is not uncommon. In recent studies, social media – and in particular the Instagram platform – has been shown to target teenage girls more unfavorably than ever before. As Instagram popularity rates skyrocket, girls’ self-esteem is plummeting.

As Instagram continues to grow, so does the content advertised to women. The platform is full of people posting photos in which they have altered their body and appearance, which has created artificial content that is free for everyone. As this toxicity persists, so does the number of girls with severe negative self-image issues.

Amanda Ralston, senior at Kirkwood High School, said seeing other people posting unrealistic and edited content can make her aware of her appearance.

“What’s really contributed to my eating disorder is seeing all of these people (posting) and comparing myself to them,” said Ralston. “A lot of people post ‘What I eat in a day’ and I think it’s really easy to compare.”

Many girls say Instagram has contributed to, if not caused, their eating disorders. Facebook studies show that 32% of girls say that when they feel bad about themselves, looking on Instagram makes it worse. As young women consume more and more content that makes them feel less good about their bodies, they become more and more depressed. As they continue to roam the platform, they find themselves in a cycle where they come to hate their bodies even more.

Instagram can be harmful for women of all ages, not just teenage girls. Kirkwood High School counselor Sarah Esslinger has said she struggles with the insecurities social media fosters even in adulthood.

“On social media, there are all these unrealistic standards imposed on women for beauty,” Esslinger said. “It’s easy to get caught up in this and feel obligated to be a certain way. ”

Studies on Facebook also found that Instagram exacerbates mental illnesses such as anxiety and depression, and 13.5% of girls say it can increase suicidal thoughts.

“I think it can cause depression in extreme cases,” said Ralston, senior at Kirkwood High. “The girls are so wrapped up in it.”

Not only does social media affect the way girls view their bodies, it can also make them feel unwanted and like they are excluded. Being able to see who everyone is with at all times tends to trick teens into thinking they’re missing out on social gatherings and dating.

“You think you have a bunch of friends and then you see people hanging out and you weren’t invited,” said Esslinger, a Kirkwood High advisor. “It sometimes becomes an unhealthy spiral. ”

Wheeler experienced it. The Kirkwood High School senior said seeing certain people in places she hadn’t been invited made her feel like she was missing something.

“I see messages and I would like to be at this event or I would like to be at this place,” she said. “It may just make me angry.”

Be aware and ask for help

Social networks play a major role in the lives of most people. The factor that gives it power is in the hands of the user.

Esslinger said that while she struggles with the negative effects of social media, she knows when to turn off her phone and recommends others to do the same every now and then.

“It’s healthy to detox completely from social media because it can be so overwhelming,” she said.

Esslinger added that it’s important for women and girls to know who they follow on social media and the type of content posted on those pages.

“Thinking about what type of accounts you follow and who is on your feed is helpful,” the advisor said.

Julie Smith, professor of media education at Webster University, also encourages girls to be informed and aware when using social media. She wants to remind them that Instagram only thrives on their time and commitment.

“I want the girls to learn the algorithms and how the ‘for you’ section of any app only exists to keep us going longer,” Smith said. “I would constantly remind him that these platforms make a lot of money for his attention and that the people who run these platforms are unelected, unaccountable and have incredible power.”

Esslinger holds a similar opinion and wants girls to know that there are always resources for help.

“I would definitely encourage anyone to talk to their school counselor. They can help any student with some of the feelings they are having, ”Esslinger said. “Simply starting with, ‘I feel like I am on the phone a lot and it has an impact on my mental health’ is a very appropriate way to start a conversation. “

And that’s exactly what Wheeler did. Realizing what made her feel so depressed, she sought help with therapy. After facing these adversities, Wheeler recommends that each girl be honest with herself and take responsibility for how she feels.

“Beauty comes in all shapes and sizes,” she said. “No one has the ability to change your perspective except yourself, so it’s important to learn to love the body you’re in.”

Caroline Steidley is a junior at Kirkwood High School. She is also an opinion writer for the school’s student newspaper, The Kirkwood Call.

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Cosmetics company Lush shuts down Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and TikTok accounts https://000111.info/cosmetics-company-lush-shuts-down-facebook-instagram-snapchat-and-tiktok-accounts/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 11:44:52 +0000 https://000111.info/cosmetics-company-lush-shuts-down-facebook-instagram-snapchat-and-tiktok-accounts/ [ad_1] British cosmetics company Lush has decided to shut down a number of its social media accounts in the 48 countries in which it operates. The move is a reaction to the “serious effects” Lush believes social media platforms are having on mental health. As Jack Constantine, Chief Digital Officer and Product Inventor at Lush, […]]]>


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British cosmetics company Lush has decided to shut down a number of its social media accounts in the 48 countries in which it operates.

The move is a reaction to the “serious effects” Lush believes social media platforms are having on mental health. As Jack Constantine, Chief Digital Officer and Product Inventor at Lush, told the BBC:

“[Social media channels] have to start listening to the reality of how they affect people’s sanity and the damage they cause through their urge for the algorithm to be able to consistently generate content, whether it’s good for users or not. “

Mark Constantine, co-founder of Lush, also explained the decision to remove the company from certain platforms:

“I have spent my whole life avoiding putting harmful ingredients in my products. There is now overwhelming evidence that we are put at risk when we use social media. I am unwilling to expose my customers to this evil. , so it’s time to take it out of the mix. “

Social accounts being closed include Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and TikTok. Lush’s YouTube and Twitter accounts will continue to function and the closure of other social accounts will be reassessed after one year. The company believes the move could cost Lush more than $ 13 million in lost sales, but hopes to “recoup that” without the need to rely on social media.

Recommended by our editors

The concern for Lush is that this move, whatever positive reaction it is sure to generate, could seriously hurt sales beyond what has been predicted. On the other hand, the concern for social media is that Lush doesn’t suffer a major loss and that other companies will decide to follow them outside of social media.

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Lush quits Facebook, Instagram, TikTok and Snapchat for security reasons | Retail business https://000111.info/lush-quits-facebook-instagram-tiktok-and-snapchat-for-security-reasons-retail-business/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 13:57:00 +0000 https://000111.info/lush-quits-facebook-instagram-tiktok-and-snapchat-for-security-reasons-retail-business/ [ad_1] Lush announced that he was closing his accounts on Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and TikTok until social media sites did a better job of protecting users from harmful content. The campaigning beauty retailer said it had “had enough” after allegations by Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen that the company puts profit above public good. Lush chief […]]]>


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Lush announced that he was closing his accounts on Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and TikTok until social media sites did a better job of protecting users from harmful content.

The campaigning beauty retailer said it had “had enough” after allegations by Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen that the company puts profit above public good.

Lush chief digital officer Jack Constantine said he would not ask customers to “meet us in a dark and dangerous alley,” adding that some social media platforms “were starting to feel like places where no one else is. should be encouraged to go… Something to change. “

Constantine said the company spends a lot of time inventing products to help people relax and take care of themselves. Social media platforms had become the antithesis of this, he argued, with algorithms designed to “scroll people and keep them from turning off and relaxing.”

The Poole-based retailer, best known for its scent soaps and bath bombs, has spearheaded campaigns linked to social causes over the years, with topics ranging from undercover police targeting activists to preventing crime. extinction of the Saint-Martin harriers.

“When the well-being of our customers is put at risk because of the channels through which we try to connect with them, then something is wrong with us,” Constantine said.

As anyone who has tried it knows, quitting social media isn’t easy. This is also true for Lush, as this is the second time the company, which has more than 400 stores in 48 countries, has said it has left the sites, having previously announced the milestone in 2019. The company blamed it. “Fomo” (fear of missing out) for relapse.

Lush said he hopes the platforms introduce strong best practice guidelines and that new laws are passed to protect users.

Until then, the company said it was trying to “protect our customers from the damage and manipulation they might suffer when trying to connect with us on social media.” All Lush brand, retail and people accounts around the world will be closed starting Friday.

The retailer said it plans to find better communication channels elsewhere, as well as use proven routes. For now, he will continue to be present on Twitter and YouTube.

Haugen, a former product manager at Facebook, leaked tens of thousands of internal company documents after being frustrated at not publicly acknowledging the damage his platforms could cause.

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The documents sparked a flurry of allegations, including that Facebook knew its products were harming adolescent mental health, fomented ethnic violence in countries like Ethiopia, and failed to tackle misinformation before the riots in the country. January 6 in Washington.

In a statement responding to Haugen’s accusations, Facebook said it continued to make significant improvements to combat the spread of disinformation and harmful content, adding: “Suggest that we encourage bad content and do nothing n is simply not true. “

Regarding the story that Facebook is harmful to adolescent mental health, the social media site pointed out a blog post by her public policy manager, Karina Newton, who said the report had “focused on a limited set of findings and cast them in a negative light.”


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Facebook articles reveal other allegations; GCHQ enters into agreement with AWS https://000111.info/facebook-articles-reveal-other-allegations-gchq-enters-into-agreement-with-aws/ https://000111.info/facebook-articles-reveal-other-allegations-gchq-enters-into-agreement-with-aws/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 08:43:09 +0000 https://000111.info/facebook-articles-reveal-other-allegations-gchq-enters-into-agreement-with-aws/ [ad_1] In this weekly segment, ExchangeWire summarizes major industry updates in media, marketing, and commerce from around the world. In this edition: Facebook has selectively controlled hate speech in India; GCHQ defended a cloud deal with Amazon Web Services; TikTok, Snap Inc. and YouTube Asked About Child Safety Protocols; and China Telecom have 60 days […]]]>


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In this weekly segment, ExchangeWire summarizes major industry updates in media, marketing, and commerce from around the world. In this edition: Facebook has selectively controlled hate speech in India; GCHQ defended a cloud deal with Amazon Web Services; TikTok, Snap Inc. and YouTube Asked About Child Safety Protocols; and China Telecom have 60 days to discontinue US services after license revocation.

Facebook selectively controls hate speech in India

According to documents obtained and published by The Associated Press, The New York Times and Bloomberg, Facebook have been selective in controlling hate speech, disinformation and inflammatory posts. The reports are titled “The Facebook Papers” and are based on a series of documents submitted by ex-employee Frances Haugen. It turned out that Facebook and WhatsApp are used to spread hatred in India, mostly anti-Muslim content, and the social media entity has known this for some time but has not acted appropriately.

It was reported that in 2019, a Facebook researcher created a fake account to analyze whether algorithms would recommend inappropriate content. One test account was a conservative mother who showed an interest in parenthood, politics, and Christianity. Within weeks, the test user’s feed was filled with fake news, as well as recommendations from QAnon activists, which continued even after the user showed no interest in those suggestions. These groups have since been banned from Facebook platforms, but an NBC News report points out that Facebook has pushed users into “rabbit holes.” The researcher left in 2020, documenting the slowness of Facebook’s response to QAnon’s recommendations in its resignation letter.

There have been other test accounts set up to understand Facebook’s algorithms in India. Indecent graphic images have been reported to have been suggested to the user, relating to a range of violent scenarios. It was understood that even the employees were shocked by the results.

The disturbing results are accompanied by the news that Facebook is propose a name change to reflect their plans to build the Metaverse – the “Next Computing Platform”.

UK spy agencies strike deal with Amazon Web Services

cloud systemAccording to reports, GCHQ, the UK government’s intelligence and security organization, has reached an agreement with Amazon Web Services (AWS) for three UK spy agencies to host classified documents in a high-security cloud system. The purchase of Amazon’s cloud service controversially allows GCHQ and sister services MI5 and MI6 to store large amounts of secret data on the US platform, but it has been suggested that Amazon would not be able to access the information held. “If this contract is concluded, Amazon will position itself as the cloud provider of choice for the world’s intelligence agencies,” Gus Hosein, executive director of Privacy International, told the Financial Times – who reported the news first.

The personalized benefits of the spy cloud offering include, but are not limited to, the ability to easily share data from overseas field locations, as well as perform faster searches within each other’s databases. Ciaran Martin, former director of the UK’s National Cyber ​​Security Center, a brand of GCHQ, said the deal would allow security services “to obtain information from huge amounts of data in minutes , rather than in a few weeks and months ”.

It has been estimated that the deal could be worth between £ 500 billion and £ 1 billion over the next decade and was signed this year. Information relating to the case was not intended to be made public.

The government intelligence agency declined to comment, telling the FT it would not discuss its business dealings with tech companies.

Snap, YouTube and TikTok Asked About Child Safety

social mediaThe leaders of a Senate panel have executives interviewed from TikTok, Snapchat and YouTube on their safety protocols, as they deepen their investigations into the impact of social media on children and teens. The hearing, titled “Protecting Kids Online: Snapchat, TikTok and YouTube,” took place on Tuesday, October 26 at 10 a.m. and underscored the need for stricter algorithms to filter out inappropriate content.

During the hearing, U.S. social media platform Snap Inc. was confronted with references to a test account created by the staff of Senator Mike Lee, to understand the initial content recommendations. Lee told Jennifer Stout, vice president of global public policy at Snap Inc., that her team profiled a 15-year-old Snapchat user, announcing that she was presented with sexualized video games that were ” extremely inappropriate for a child ”. Stout guaranteed that the “discover” feature on the messaging app is tightly moderated, commenting, “if it violates our guidelines, this type of content would decrease.”

Much of the attention of the Senate Trade Committee was focused on TikTok during Tuesday’s hearing. The panel cracked down on algorithms and asked if the Chinese platform continues to glorify sanity, violence and drugs – referring to a recent Wall Street Journal Report. Michael Beckerman, vice president and head of US public policy for TikTok, disagreed with the Journal, saying the article did not show “an authentic experience that a real user would have.” He added that improvements have been made since then. Further investigations into data sharing were carried out when Senator Ted Cruz referred to TikTok’s testimony where they denied sharing data with the Chinese Communist Party. Senator Cruz deemed this statement “misleading” due to suggestions that the company shares user data with ByteDance. Quoting information from the platform’s privacy policy, Cruz read: “We may share any information we collect with a parent,” to which he replied, “There is much more to what we are talking about. sees “.

The YouTube experience turned out a little differently. After paying a fine of US $ 170 million (£ 124 million) in 2019, due to an alleged violation of online privacy rules regarding children, the video-sharing platform has already given the Make online safety a priority by removing the Like feature from YouTube Kids. Continuing their efforts, YouTube announced that it will start demonetizing children’s channels if they produce low-quality content that encourages negative behavior. The new was conveniently announced a day before questioning. These changes were taken into account during the hearing.

The question line was from a former Facebook employee that of Frances Haugen advocate for new child safety measures on social media, after providing evidence of Facebook’s disregard for mental health.

TikTok and Snap were testifying before Congress for the first time.

China Telecom facing US FCC license revocation

telecommunicationsThe United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) approved an order to revoke the license of China Telecom doing business in the United States. The vote stemmed from the FCC’s national security concerns, citing findings that the telecommunications company “is subject to the exploitation, influence and control of the Chinese government and is very likely to be coerced into. comply with Chinese government demands without sufficient legal procedures subject to judicial review ”.

Since the vote on Tuesday, October 26, China Telecom Americas has 60 days to shut down its services in the United States. The move is the latest setback against what the United States has described as key network infiltration by Chinese companies, with Huawei Technologies also involved. The tech platform has faced previous battles, when the United States initially accused them of stealing trade secrets in 2019. They have since resolved these criminal charges.

According to a Senate report, China Telecom provided service to more than 335 million subscribers worldwide in 2019, claiming to be one of the largest fixed line and broadband operators in the world. They called the announcement “disappointing,” and although they did not comment on the allegations, they previously denied posing a security risk.

Also in the news:

– The evolution of audio advertising – Q&A with Pierre Naggar, AdsWizz

– The importance of mastering perishable data – Q&A with Alex Petrie, Skyrise Intelligence

– Decentralization can improve advertising for all: Q&A with Alkimi Exchange

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Instagram plans to promote funny memes and nature photos to tackle body image issues https://000111.info/instagram-plans-to-promote-funny-memes-and-nature-photos-to-tackle-body-image-issues/ https://000111.info/instagram-plans-to-promote-funny-memes-and-nature-photos-to-tackle-body-image-issues/#respond Tue, 26 Oct 2021 21:20:45 +0000 https://000111.info/instagram-plans-to-promote-funny-memes-and-nature-photos-to-tackle-body-image-issues/ [ad_1] SOPA Images / LightRocket via Getty Images AAfter realizing that Instagram’s emphasis on ideal body images was damaging some users’ self-image and sanity, a group of company researchers came up with the idea of ​​distracting users with nature images and humorous memes, among other measures. The lighter content could compensate for the damage, they […]]]>


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AAfter realizing that Instagram’s emphasis on ideal body images was damaging some users’ self-image and sanity, a group of company researchers came up with the idea of ​​distracting users with nature images and humorous memes, among other measures. The lighter content could compensate for the damage, they reasoned.

The researchers also suggested that Instagram could focus on posts with positive hashtags about body issues, like #loveyourself, and images of models of average height or above. Their work concluded that several essential Instagram elements were making matters worse, and if the company wanted to take drastic action, it might consider limiting likes or comments on a post, or even disabling its filter collection. photo, perhaps the most of the application. famous feature. It’s unclear if Instagram has taken any of these steps, although it obviously hasn’t taken the most dramatic, like removing filters.

While the Instagram team seemed undecided on the best course of action, they had come to some definitive conclusions on the issue at hand. “33% of Instagram users and 11% of Facebook users believe the platform is making their body image problems worse,” the report says. “Substantial evidence suggests that experiences on Instagram or Facebook worsen body dissatisfaction, especially viewing attractive images of others, viewing filtered images, posting selfies, and viewing content with certain hashtags.”

This 2020 report was not previously reported and comes from documents provided by Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen to the Securities and Exchange Commission, which were also provided to Congress in redacted form by her legal team. The redacted versions received by Congress were obtained by a consortium of news agencies, including Forbes.

Haugen’s documents, which became known as Facebook Papers, present an extremely detailed picture of Facebook and its struggles to balance its size and growth with a constellation of issues on its apps. One of the issues highlighted by these documents is how Instagram damages the mental health of its users, who see an ecosystem of organized and highly edited images, and then despair when their own lives, bodies and surroundings fail. not look like these photos. This is especially concerning given Instagram’s popularity with teens, a cohort already at risk for developing body image issues. (7.5% of its users are under 17, according to Statista data, and over 40% are under the age of 24.) Politicians have taken hold of this issue, hoping to find something easy for voters to understand that could perhaps lead to new regulation around the media. social. A Senate subcommittee has already heard testimony from Facebook security chief Antigone Davis and whistleblower Haugen. On Tuesday, it expanded its investigation by hosting executives from TikTok, YouTube and Snap, three other apps favored by teens.

The 2020 Body Image Report coincides with the first reports of The Wall Street Journal, who published the first stories based on the Haugen documents. The newspaper reported on additional internal reports showing that 32% of teenage girls said Instagram made them feel worse about their bodies. Overall, 20% of teens told Instagram researchers that the app made them feel less good about themselves. Facebook has dismissed nearly all of the reports from the Haugen leaks as being too sensational and a misunderstanding of Facebook’s efforts. Speaking to Wall Street analysts on the company’s earnings call last night, CEO Mark Zuckerberg said, “My take on what we’re seeing is a coordinated effort to selectively use the documents. disclosed to create a false image of our company. “

This 2020 body image report contains several other surprising numbers. He cited an earlier study which found that 33% of those polled believed Instagram made their body image worse, and 66% of teenage girls on Instagram said they had body images. Almost a quarter of those surveyed said they had been harassed on Instagram and experienced some form of discrimination on the app. Almost 30% said Instagram got worse by ending an in-person relationship, likely because the app offered the option to continue monitoring the other person.

While offering possible solutions to the problem, the report also took the opportunity to highlight several ideas that the researchers said would not alleviate the problems. For example, the researchers concluded that promoting positive captions was not particularly constructive: it made some average-height users feel better, but had little impact on overweight or thin users. They also concluded that it was not useful to put warning labels on harmful body images. This raises questions about the effectiveness of labels applied to content on other Facebook apps, a practice the company has increasingly turned to over the past two years. He slapped labels on dangerous content related to the 2020 election, pandemic and coronavirus vaccines, typically directing users to a portal for verified information on the subject.

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