earlier year – 000111 http://000111.info/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 20:31:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://000111.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-35-120x120.png earlier year – 000111 http://000111.info/ 32 32 People Desperate For COVID Testing Turn To Resellers On Instagram, Facebook, TikTok, Craigslist, LinkedIn, eBay https://000111.info/people-desperate-for-covid-testing-turn-to-resellers-on-instagram-facebook-tiktok-craigslist-linkedin-ebay/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 14:15:00 +0000 https://000111.info/people-desperate-for-covid-testing-turn-to-resellers-on-instagram-facebook-tiktok-craigslist-linkedin-ebay/ When Patrick Kennedy, a nightlife artist in New York City, was recently exposed to COVID-19, he was desperate for faster tests to not only monitor his health, but also know when he could return to work. “It is impossible to find COVID tests due to the shortage in the city,” said Kennedy, who works hourly […]]]>


When Patrick Kennedy, a nightlife artist in New York City, was recently exposed to COVID-19, he was desperate for faster tests to not only monitor his health, but also know when he could return to work.

“It is impossible to find COVID tests due to the shortage in the city,” said Kennedy, who works hourly to pay his bills. “I want to go back to work, but I have to make sure I take the right precautions and don’t expose anyone else.”

After queuing at testing centers and visiting drugstores to buy rapid tests, to no avail, he came across an Instagram post from someone he had been to high school with who offered to sell them directly to people: $ 20 for each test, plus a $ 5 delivery charge – cheaper than some tests found in drugstores. Kennedy bought five.

He is among a growing number of people who have taken to sites such as Instagram, Facebook, TikTok, Craigslist, LinkedIn and eBay for a home COVID test as they sell themselves in drugstores. across the country and the queues for testing centers can last for hours.

Kennedy’s former classmate Joey, an electrician who asked not to share his name for privacy reasons, bought a stash of 100 test kits from his friend who works at a healthcare company.

“I have to get tested for work, so it was getting really boring having to wait three hours in emergency care, and sometimes, not even getting one,” Joey told CNN, noting that he had paid. $ 45 for two tests in pharmacies. “It just wasn’t sustainable.”

After buying them in bulk – 100 tests for $ 900 (about $ 9 each) – he started offering them on Facebook and Instagram to people in his local community. He said he sold 25 overnight and 45 the next day; many of whom were foreigners and parents, who needed tests to send their children back to school after winter break. I was one of them.

A shortage of COVID tests

After a long winter break, my son was scheduled to return to kindergarten on Monday morning. A negative COVID test was required, and the only one we had came back inconclusive. As we isolated ourselves the previous days, panic swept through me: Where would we find another test in the midst of a shortage in the New York City area in time for school the next day? After seeing Joey’s post on a local parents’ Facebook group, I got one 45 minutes later without ever leaving the house. I was left with many questions: was it ethical? Is the test still real?

“I’m not looking to do a murder,” Joey later told me. “I had access to the tests – I didn’t pile them up or buy too much at a drugstore – and it’s almost criminal that people stand in line for hours in the cold, probably getting sicker. J decided to deliver them directly to Maisons. “

Facebook told CNN Business that it banned the sale of test kits on our platforms and had a system for regulators and law enforcement to report behavior they believe to be illegal or against our rules. eBay, TikTok, and Craigslist did not respond to a request for comment. It is LinkedIn’s policy to remove all posts aimed at selling articles, whether or not related to the pandemic.

Newsom asks for $ 2.7 billion to fight COVID-19 pandemic

The emergence of COVID test resales comes as frustrated Americans struggle to get tested and face long lines amid increased demand following vacation trips and gatherings.

Amazon, CVS Health, and Walgreens are limiting the number of in-home COVID kits customers can purchase. Walmart recently increased the prices of some of its rapid COVID tests from $ 14 to $ 20 for two.

Experts say reselling kits in small numbers and without a significant markup is not illegal – neither is purchasing such products – but there are risks, both for buyers and sellers.

“We have received reports that unauthorized sellers are trying to profit from the pandemic by selling COVID-19 tests online,” Washington DC Attorney General Karl Racine wrote in a tweet on Tuesday. “Please be careful and only purchase tests through authorized retailers to ensure the integrity of your test.”

The Federal Trade Commission recently released tips on how to avoid buying fake COVID tests online, such as verifying buyers, paying by credit card to dispute scam fees, and purchase only kits approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

The Biden administration recently promised to distribute 500 million free home tests, but it is not known when a website will launch for Americans to request these tests and by what time frame they will be shipped. A senior government official told CNN last week that he was “working on all the details. And we will have them in the coming weeks.”

The administration also said reimbursement for home tests would begin next week through insurance companies.

An opportunity for another pandemic second-hand market

In the meantime, Joey is doing some good business. But his efforts have met with mixed reactions; some people on Facebook criticized how he would make a profit by reselling tests, others came to his defense: “This kid isn’t doing any price hikes at all and he’s taking the opportunity to make things easier for people. He’s even ready to deliver – damn it! “

Eventually, Joey’s post was deleted by the group moderator. He was not told why.

Arthur Caplan, a professor of bioethics at the Grossman School of Medicine at New York University, said the trend was also evident on his local Facebook parent group in Connecticut.

“A black market that skews the availability of tests to those who can pay is completely a reflection of the failure of government at national and state levels to provide adequate tests,” he said. “Am I surprised that a black market has started to flourish? Not at all. There are a lot of places that say you can’t come here unless you tested negative, but there are no tests. black market people, an opportunity. “

Beyond fairness concerns, buying COVID-19 tests from strangers is prone to fraud – people don’t know who they are or what they’re actually offering.

“It’s unethical to raise prices in the face of panic and scarcity, but it will continue,” Caplan said. “As for the people who buy them, what are they going to do? They can’t find any tests otherwise. I can’t fault someone for wanting to protect their child, but then you have to remember the person who sells you something on the black market might sell you something that won’t work. “

This is not the first time that a secondary market has appeared during the pandemic. In the spring of 2020, a shortage of protective equipment sparked an aftermarket. “We used some of it (at the NYU hospital), but often it would tear, tear, or not meet manufacturing standards,” Caplan said. “Sometimes black market people would take the money and never deliver it at all.”

It is also not the first time that these issues of scarcity and equity have arisen during the pandemic. Earlier last year, concierge health care provider One Medical was investigated for allowing friends and family members of its executives and wealthier clients to avoid queues to get vaccinated.

While reselling COVID-19 tests is not blatantly illegal, Jessica Rich, a former FTC official who has worked on consumer protection issues, said if there was collusive behavior between entities or organizations. individuals, or a misleading claim made in connection with sales, then perhaps certain state laws, the FTC law – which prohibits inappropriate or deceptive practices – or the Unfair, Deceptive or Abusive Acts and Practices Act (UDAAP ) could apply.

“If someone sells a small number, like a few dozen, a federal agency is not going to prosecute someone who does this on that scale, especially if they’re open about the price,” Rich said.

However, pandemic profits could potentially end badly for sellers. At the start of the pandemic, Matt and Noah Colvin became infamous for hoarding and selling hand sanitizer. Markets like Amazon and eBay have taken down their listings and warned others that they could lose their accounts. They ended up with more than 17,000 bottles and nowhere to sell them, according to the New York Times. (One of the brothers then expressed regret and donated supplies to charity.)

A Craigslist salesperson, who asked to remain anonymous, said he started reselling tests after standing in line for hours, missing work and paying a premium for PCR results without insurance, in hopes of get some of their money back. “I feel a little shabby inflating the price, but COVID messed up my job and I have to pay rent,” the listing reads. “I had to call over 50 pharmacies on the way from DC to find them.” The salesperson told CNN Business he “would personally pay double not to process lines and get results quickly if he was available.”

Some, like Joey, have been kicked out of Facebook groups. Russell Schwartz and his wife Katherine Quirk-Schwartz, a nurse, run a South Florida Facebook page that connects people with resources related to COVID-19. In recent weeks, they have shifted part of the group’s focus of helping people find vaccines to helping members locate home testing kits. Schwartz said he kicked people out of the group for trying to sell tests.

“Our biggest fear is that individuals will pray for our group because of the size, population and demographics of older users,” Quirk-Schwartz said.

Additional reporting by Jennifer Korn of CNN Business


]]>
Here’s what Indians did on Instagram and Facebook in 2021 https://000111.info/heres-what-indians-did-on-instagram-and-facebook-in-2021/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 07:45:07 +0000 https://000111.info/heres-what-indians-did-on-instagram-and-facebook-in-2021/ Meta (formerly Facebook) recently unveiled its annual “Year in Review” list to share top hot topics on social media platforms Facebook and Twitter throughout 2021. In a press briefing, Meta said the “Year in Review” list reflects the themes that define the main keywords for the year. He said that for 2021, COVID and health, […]]]>


Meta (formerly Facebook) recently unveiled its annual “Year in Review” list to share top hot topics on social media platforms Facebook and Twitter throughout 2021. In a press briefing, Meta said the “Year in Review” list reflects the themes that define the main keywords for the year. He said that for 2021, COVID and health, sports and an assortment of cultural moments and topics have captured the minds of Indians on Facebook and Instagram. The list also includes a section of what was all the rage on Reels, the short videos on Instagram. Let’s take a look:

1. COVID and health – Like other platforms, Instagram and Facebook were a big help during the devastating second wave in April-May this year. Meta said “prayer,” “oxygen” and “hospital” were the hottest topics in the topic of COVID-19 and health. each other for support on our platforms. “These terms then moved on to various topics related to ‘vaccines’ and ‘immunization’, as people rushed to get vaccinated. The ‘flaxseeds’ also emerged as a trend in COVID and Health topics, as people shared and discussed its health benefits.

2. Sports – Despite the devastating impact of COVID-19, 2021 was also the year in which many sporting events returned. The Indians have shown a keen interest in the “Tokyo Olympics” as we achieved our highest number of medals in Tokyo earlier this year. year. The “Tokyo Olympics”, “Paralympic Games”, “Gold Medal”, “ICC World Testing Championship” and “Women’s International One Day Cricket” were some of the highlights. main trends in sport.

3. Cultural moments and topics – In this category, “Garba” emerged as the main trend. Additionally, with the release of the movie “Shershaah” around Independence Day, “Captain Vikram Batra” has also become one of the main trends, with “Jewelry” and “Cryptocurrency” emerging as topics of interest. interest, a reflection of traditional and modern perspectives of India.

4. Trends on the reels – on Reels, the short videos on Instagram, Indian songs were among the most popular. Also, several trends like Bachpan Ka Pyaar, which is a lip sync and dance trend, Baarish Ki Jaaye, which is a trend involving Remix and an AR effect, and Lut Gaye (feat. Emraan Hashmi), which is a trend Lip sync have been some of the Indian trends that have picked up Reels this year. Here is a full list of Instagram and Facebook trends in India:

Complete list of all the trends on Instagram, Facebook in India in 2021

Covid and health

  • Pray
  • Oxygen
  • Vaccine
  • Hospital
  • Flax seed

Sports

  • Gold medal
  • Tokyo Olympics
  • ICC World Trials Championship
  • Women’s international cricket for a day
  • Paralympic Games

Cultural moments

  • Garba
  • Captain Vikram Batra
  • Independence Day
  • Jewelry
  • Cryptocurrency

Some of the best songs on Reels (Last 90 days)

  • Raataan Lambiyan (from “Shershaah”), by Tanishk Bagchi
  • love nwantiti (feat. Dj Yo! & AX’EL) [Remix], by CKay
  • Tu Milta Hai Mujhe, by Raj Barman
  • Terre Pyaar Mein, by Himesh Reshammiya
  • Naam Tera, by Ndee Kundu

Some of the best trends on Reels

  • Raataan Lambiyan (From “Shershaah”) (lip sync tendency)
  • IPhone Lock Screen (AR Effect Trend)
  • Bachpan Ka Pyaar (lip sync & dance trend)
  • Baarish Ki Jaaye (Remix & RA trend)
  • Lut Gaye (feat. Emraan Hashmi) (lip sync trend)

Some of the best AR effects used

  • redglitch by @ccssiano
  • Party lights by @dhfdz_
  • Red rose by @maf ._. A07
  • Maple by @vieryvito
  • AL1 Soften @ rahmamqf

Read all the latest news, breaking news and news on the coronavirus here.


]]>
Like Nastya’s Upcoming YouTube Videos on Facebook via Jellysmack Deal https://000111.info/like-nastyas-upcoming-youtube-videos-on-facebook-via-jellysmack-deal/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 15:00:00 +0000 https://000111.info/like-nastyas-upcoming-youtube-videos-on-facebook-via-jellysmack-deal/ Like Nastya, the 7-year-old YouTube megastar, has signed an agreement with internet video distribution company Jellysmack to expand her reach on Facebook. Jellysmack will optimize and syndicate Like Nastya content to reach new audiences on Facebook, where its official page currently only has 18,000 subscribers. The hugely popular young Russian-American joins Jellysmack’s roster of creative […]]]>


Like Nastya, the 7-year-old YouTube megastar, has signed an agreement with internet video distribution company Jellysmack to expand her reach on Facebook.

Jellysmack will optimize and syndicate Like Nastya content to reach new audiences on Facebook, where its official page currently only has 18,000 subscribers. The hugely popular young Russian-American joins Jellysmack’s roster of creative partners including PewDiePie, MrBeast and Patrick Starrr.

Nastya Radzinskaya, better known online as Like Nastya, currently ranks number one as the largest individual creator of children on YouTube, recently surpassing 250 million total subscribers on 15 different channels under the umbrella brand. Like Nastya. Nastya and her family launched their first YouTube channel in 2016, which today has over 82 million subscribers and generates over 2 billion monthly views.

Popular videos on Like Nastya’s channels include family vacation vlogs, short comedy sketches, accountability lessons, and games. Originally from Russia, the Radzinskaya family now resides in Miami. Earlier this year, the family signed an agreement with Westbrook Studios, co-founded by Jada Pinkett Smith and Will Smith, to develop a roster of animation projects ranging from shows for preschoolers to ‘Family of Four’ programming. quadrants ”.

“Nastya leads the children’s content category on YouTube, but we see so much potential for her on other platforms,” Eyal Baumel, director of Nastya and CEO of global multi-channel network Yoola, said in a statement. “This partnership with Jellysmack will allow Nastya to focus on what she does best – creating fun, family-friendly content – while simultaneously reaching a whole new audience on Facebook and growing her global community of children.”

Jellysmack will use its proprietary AI technology to expand the Like Nastya fan base on Facebook. Rather than just reposting the original Like Nastya YouTube videos, Jellysmack says, the company will adapt them for Facebook through multivariate testing to find the optimal audience.

“Nastya is a bit of an anomaly with the extent of her appeal,” said Jeff Olson, head of Jellysmack Creator Partnerships. “Not only does its playful and positive content align with our brand values, but it also allows us to spread that positivity to a young generation of creators and viewers who truly is the future of the industry. We’re excited to be able to connect her with a new audience on Facebook.

Jellysmack was co-founded in 2016 by Michael Philippe, Robin Sabban and Swann Maizil. The company’s list of more than 400 clients includes MrBeast, PewDiePie, Bailey Sarian, Brad Mondo, Karina Garcia, Derek Deso and Patrick Starrr. Jellysmack optimizes and distributes video content created by creators on Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, TikTok, Twitter and YouTube.


]]>
Facebook whistleblower fears Meta’s plan for the Metaverse https://000111.info/facebook-whistleblower-fears-metas-plan-for-the-metaverse/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://000111.info/facebook-whistleblower-fears-metas-plan-for-the-metaverse/ Meta Platforms, the owner of Facebook, is race to build the “metaverse”, and Frances Haugen is worried. The company’s notorious struggles to moderate content on its social media platform do not bode well for Meta’s ability to control what gets posted in the virtual world, said Haugen, the former Facebook product manager who has told […]]]>


Meta Platforms, the owner of Facebook, is race to build the “metaverse”, and Frances Haugen is worried. The company’s notorious struggles to moderate content on its social media platform do not bode well for Meta’s ability to control what gets posted in the virtual world, said Haugen, the former Facebook product manager who has told lawmakers in October that Facebook prioritizes profit over user safety and programs its algorithms to promote divisive content.

“These are the exact same issues you’re going to see in VR,” Haugen said in an interview with CBS News, adding, “Facebook didn’t really design security from the start.”

Haugen said platforms like TikTok, where a small portion of the content drives the most views, are easier to moderate compared to Facebook’s more distributed model. In virtual spaces where Meta is betting big, moderating content, removing misinformation, and tracking violators will be a challenge as interactions go unrecorded.

“You don’t know who the person told you that horrible comment is,” Haugen said, noting that there are technological solutions that could protect people in the metaverse, such as logging activity.

“You could keep the last 20 minutes all the time and for the audio at least it’s not that much,” she said. “But it shows that they don’t have security by design because it’s an easy feature to have.”

Meta thoroughly on the metaverse

Meta CEO Mark Zuckberberg said the Metaverse – a so far mainly theoretical network of 3D virtual environments accessible with augmented and virtual reality headsets – will be the “successor to mobile internet. “Meta is spending $ 10 billion this year to create products and protocols that support video games, concerts, and workplace collaboration tools – a significant amount for a company that reported $ 29.01 billion. income dollars in the last quarter.

Experts believe that Zuckerberg’s vision of a open virtual ecosystem could cost between $ 800 billion and $ 1 trillion, and require the involvement of the company biggest rivals, including Microsoft, Google, Apple and others.

To that end, Meta has made an effort to show that it plans to work with other stakeholders to develop the Metaverse. In September, the company said building the interconnected grids would take up to 15 years and pledged to work with governments and academic researchers on key issues. He launched a two-year, $ 50 million research program to work with civil rights groups and nonprofits “to determine how to responsibly build these technologies.”

Last month, the company also announced a partnership with the Digital Wellness Lab at Boston Children’s Hospital to develop a digital youth literacy program for the Metaverse.

Haugen is not reassured by Meta’s commitment to collaborate. She said prioritizing building a virtual reality world suggests Zuckerberg is “disassociating himself” from the company’s current challenges, and she urged lawmakers to pressure Facebook to change its algorithms. and its content recommendation practices.

She suggested that lawmakers and regulators take into account the risks parents, community groups and activists attribute to Facebook’s algorithms and “combine the company’s assessment of its risk with the community’s assessment.” .

“Facebook should have to articulate what it’s going to do to fix each evil, because as long as Facebook is operating in the dark, they won’t do enough on any of these issues,” she said.

In a Senate hearing last week, Meta-owned Instagram CEO Adam Mosseri pledged transparency regarding the use of algorithms and ranking models.

“I can urge you today to provide meaningful access to the data so that third-party researchers can design their own studies and draw their conclusions on the effects of well-being on young people,” he said. “And on the ranking, I can commit to doing whatever I can to explain how the ranking works and to find other ways for us to be transparent about the algorithms.”


Senators burn Instagram heads

02:42

Meta has defended its efforts to improve the tech giant’s content moderation practices. The company notes that it publishes a content enforcement report quarterly and is on track to spend more than $ 5 billion on security concerns this year. Meta also said it was working with independent academic researchers to examine the role Facebook played in the 2020 election.

“Every day, our teams must strike a balance between protecting the ability of billions of people to speak up and ensuring the security of our platform,” said Meta spokesperson Nkechi Nneji. , in a statement to CBS News. “While there is still work to be done, we continue to make progress with these investments,” she added.

Still, Haugen, who worked on algorithms while at Facebook, said the ranking models and the challenges associated with them aren’t going away anytime soon.

“The fundamental problem of our time is whether we want to be ruled by algorithms or do we want to be ruled by people,” she said.


Facebook rebranding in Meta

05:11

Meta argued that algorithms make the social media experience more meaningful for users. The company says its recommender technology is designed to increase positive sessions and bring family and friends closer together.

Nick Clegg, vice president of global affairs at Meta, wrote an essay titled “Tango Takes Two” earlier this year, in which he described content ranking as a “dynamic partnership between people and algorithms.” .

The personalized ‘world’ of your news feed is strongly shaped by your choices and actions. It’s mostly made up of content from the friends and family you choose to connect with on the platform, the pages you choose to follow, and the groups. you choose to join, “Clegg wrote.” Ranking then is the process of using algorithms to order that content. “

Current legislation?

Lawmakers have said for months that bipartisan legislation to regulate social media companies is underway. They held multiple hearings, training tech CEOs and industry experts to answer questions about algorithms, content moderation, and user privacy. Senior executives from Meta, Twitter, Google, YouTube, Snapchat and TikTok have all testified before the House and Senate this year, but meaningful legislation is still lagging behind.

Haugen, who signed a contract with Little Brown and Co. on Thursday, said she remained patient, while saying “the normal mechanisms to control a trillion dollar business do not exist.”

“We have already overcome huge, seemingly impossible things,” she said. “The Soviet Union fell, the British left India, apartheid ended. All of these things were impossible. They were impossible until they were inevitable.”


]]>
Twitch appoints former Facebook director to support underrepresented creators – The Hollywood Reporter https://000111.info/twitch-appoints-former-facebook-director-to-support-underrepresented-creators-the-hollywood-reporter/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 01:52:40 +0000 https://000111.info/twitch-appoints-former-facebook-director-to-support-underrepresented-creators-the-hollywood-reporter/ Twitch announced on Wednesday that Kendra Desrosiers has been appointed global head of strategic programs and culture. In this role, Desrosiers, a former director of marketing at Meta (formerly Facebook) who leads partnerships and media strategies for a multitude of media products aimed at empowering artists, will advocate for under-represented creators and develop programs to […]]]>


Twitch announced on Wednesday that Kendra Desrosiers has been appointed global head of strategic programs and culture.

In this role, Desrosiers, a former director of marketing at Meta (formerly Facebook) who leads partnerships and media strategies for a multitude of media products aimed at empowering artists, will advocate for under-represented creators and develop programs to promote value their voices, as well as oversee initiatives based on social impact and strengthen the reach of Twitch in colleges and universities.

“Twitch is a pioneer in the creator economy and I’m thrilled to join such a crucial platform for giving creators a voice,” said Desrosiers, whose tech background also includes a leadership role at YouTube in which she worked on Multicultural Empowerment and LGBTQ Storytellers.

“I’m excited to join the Twitch creator community to understand their challenges, celebrate their successes, create new opportunities and champion diverse voices on the platform as Twitch enters its next chapter. “

She will report to Constance Knight, vice president of global creators, who was hired earlier this year and who previously worked at Instagram to oversee curation of shorthand video content.

“Twitch is a rich community of diverse content creators, and nothing is more important to us than ensuring that all creators can be successful on our service,” said Knight. “Kendra has a wealth of experience in developing inclusive programs for creators, and her knowledge will be a huge asset to our team as we work to ensure Twitch continues to be the best place to create.”

The Amazon-owned live streaming company hired its first head of diversity and inclusion in 2018 with the appointment of Katrina Jones, a former Vimeo executive. Twitch has since addressed its hateful conduct and harassment policy following concerns about the safety of creators and users.

Last year, former Microsoft chief executive Angela Hession was hired as Global Vice President of Trust and Security.


]]>
Amazon Charges Sellers Fees High Enough To Make Up For Losses From Prime, New Report Says https://000111.info/amazon-charges-sellers-fees-high-enough-to-make-up-for-losses-from-prime-new-report-says/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 16:23:23 +0000 https://000111.info/amazon-charges-sellers-fees-high-enough-to-make-up-for-losses-from-prime-new-report-says/ The massive reach of Amazon’s ecommerce platform is appealing to any small business looking to sell their products online. But a new report suggests the cost of doing business may turn into a Faustian boon for a third-party seller, as the fees Amazon bills them can quickly eat into profits. Amazon toll road, a report […]]]>


The massive reach of Amazon’s ecommerce platform is appealing to any small business looking to sell their products online. But a new report suggests the cost of doing business may turn into a Faustian boon for a third-party seller, as the fees Amazon bills them can quickly eat into profits.

Amazon toll road, a report from the nonprofit Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR), found that Amazon billed third-party sellers a total of $ 121 billion in fees this year alone. According to the report, written by ILSR co-director Stacy Mitchell, these fees – for things like advertising, referrals, and shipping – typically mean small businesses are losing money to Amazon. ; Mitchell said that in 2014 sellers paid Amazon $ 19 out of $ 100 in sales, and today it looks more like $ 34 per $ 100 in sales.

And, Amazon masks the profits it makes from these small businesses in its financial reports, lumping them together with other less lucrative divisions “because showing that they generate those profits from small businesses is not a good idea. idea, “Mitchell said in an interview with The edge.

But its Amazon Prime subscription service – considered a money loser for the e-commerce giant – provides Amazon with a loyal base of buyers who want to get their money’s worth with free shipping. Profits Amazon earns from selling fees subsidize losses in its Prime division, the report said.

“If you’re a business that makes or sells consumer products, you’re damned if you don’t sell on Amazon and damned if you do,” Mitchell said. A small retailer might try using their own website to reach out to customers, but Mitchell says this is often akin to “essentially hanging your shingle on a dirt road because of the role Prime has in Amazon often. the first and the only place customers go when shopping on the Internet. Former Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos said in his last annual letter to investors in April that by this point Amazon Prime had grown to 200 million subscribers.

There are other ecommerce platforms where a small business could sell their products online, theoretically charging customers of those sites different prices than their Amazon customers. But if the seller wants to keep selling on Amazon as well, they need to keep the same prices across the board. Under that of Amazon Fair pricing policy, a seller could be penalized if Amazon finds out that the seller is charging customers a different price for their products on other ecommerce platforms. Penalties can range from removing the seller’s product from the prominent “buy box” on a product listing page, to termination of selling privileges.

Amazon says the fair pricing policy targets pricing practices that “undermine customer confidence,” but the ILSR report concluded that this generally means that customers can end up paying more globally, as third-party sellers have to inflate them. price they charge customers to be able to pay Amazon’s fees and make a profit, Mitchell explained.

Amazon spokesperson Brooke Oberwetter said in an emailed statement to The edge that the ILSR report was “intentionally misleading” and that it confused Amazon’s selling fees with the cost of the “optional services” some sellers buy, such as logistics and advertising. Those fees range from 8 to 17 percent of the sale price, Oberwetter said. “These selling fees are very competitive compared to other selling options such as marketplaces like Walmart, Target, eBay, Etsy and others, or direct to the consumer through companies like Shopify and BigCommerce.”

In addition, Oberwetter said, some third-party Amazon sellers are purchasing its Fulfillment by Amazon logistics service, which it said offered fulfillment services 30% cheaper than other logistics providers, as well as faster shipping. .

“Some sellers also choose to buy advertising from Amazon or use other advertising providers like Google, Facebook and Twitter,” Oberwetter added. “Sellers are not required to use our logistics or advertising services, and only use them if they add value to their business. ”

This claim that seller’s fees are not mandatory echoes Bezos’ testimony before Congress Last year. Asked by Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon (D-PA) about what appeared to be a steep increase in the fees that sellers pay to Amazon, Bezos said, “When you see those fees go up, what really happens is that sellers choose to use more of our services than we make available.

The ILSR report, however, posits that the fees are practically necessary if sellers want their products to be visible in places like Amazon’s “customers who also viewed this item” carousels on search results pages. . And unlike other forms of advertising, where a business places ads, reaches customers, and then sells directly to those customers, Amazon’s policies prevent most sellers from forming these types of direct relationships with customers. But, Amazon tested a feature earlier this year that would allow sellers to contact customers directly.

Mitchell writes in the report that an effective policy solution would separate Amazon’s divisions (Market, Retail, AWS, and Logistics) into stand-alone companies. She said an Amazon break-up seems more likely than it has been in recent years; the new president of the Federal Trade Commission, Lina Khan, “sees the dangers of big technologies”. Earlier this year, Amazon actually asked Khan to opt out of proceedings regarding the company. And while there has been an overall increase in antitrust scrutiny of President Biden’s and Congressional administration, Mitchell notes, it remains to be seen whether there is enough momentum behind the renewed emphasis on antitrust issues.

“A year ago, if you had asked me, would we have bipartisan anti-trust bills in Congress with the types of co-sponsorship that we are seeing, I would have been surprised at the progress made, ”she said. “We went much further, much faster than expected. “


]]>
New Zealand Prime Minister says Facebook, others must do more against online hate https://000111.info/new-zealand-prime-minister-says-facebook-others-must-do-more-against-online-hate/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 12:30:51 +0000 https://000111.info/new-zealand-prime-minister-says-facebook-others-must-do-more-against-online-hate/ Tech giants like Meta’s Facebook and world leaders needed to do “much more” to root out violent extremism and online radicalization, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said on Friday. Ardern and French President Emmanuel Macron launched a global initiative to end online hate in 2019 after a white supremacist killed 51 people in two […]]]>


Tech giants like Meta’s Facebook and world leaders needed to do “much more” to root out violent extremism and online radicalization, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said on Friday.

Ardern and French President Emmanuel Macron launched a global initiative to end online hate in 2019 after a white supremacist killed 51 people in two mosques in the New Zealand city of Christchurch while live streaming his outburst on Facebook.

This Christchurch appeal initiative has been supported by more than 50 countries, international organizations and tech companies, including Facebook, Google, Twitter and Microsoft.

Ardern said on Friday that the initiative was successful in its first goal of establishing a crisis protocol, including a 24/7 network between platforms to quickly remove content, in response to events like those of Christchurch.

“We have had real world stress tests of these systems and they have worked very efficiently,” Ardern said in an interview for the upcoming Reuters Next.

“I am convinced that we are operating more efficiently than before,” she added. “The next challenge, however, is to go even further.”

When asked what tech companies should be doing, Ardern replied, “a lot more.”

Ardern said the next step is to focus on prevention, looking at how people find or come across hate or terrorist content online and perhaps can become radicalized.

“This is where we are really interested in the ongoing work around algorithms and the role we can all play in ensuring that online platforms do not become a place of radicalization,” she said.

A Christchurch Appeal conference earlier this year brought together the United States and Britain.


]]>
Amazon Studios is on the verge of a deal to make a Mass Effect TV series https://000111.info/amazon-studios-is-on-the-verge-of-a-deal-to-make-a-mass-effect-tv-series/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 00:45:00 +0000 https://000111.info/amazon-studios-is-on-the-verge-of-a-deal-to-make-a-mass-effect-tv-series/ The streaming wars and consumer habits have forced studios to scramble to find the next big franchise. Unfortunately, the world’s “Star Wars” and “Harry Potter” safe bets are well locked up in other studios. Everyone has to look elsewhere. While many video game movies have been to varying degrees terrible, the video games themselves represent […]]]>


The streaming wars and consumer habits have forced studios to scramble to find the next big franchise. Unfortunately, the world’s “Star Wars” and “Harry Potter” safe bets are well locked up in other studios. Everyone has to look elsewhere. While many video game movies have been to varying degrees terrible, the video games themselves represent worlds full of rich storytelling with massive built-in audiences. Done right, like Netflix’s “Castlevania,” video game adaptations could be the next entertainment gold rush.

As such, Amazon attacking “Mass Effect” makes a lot of sense. There are several games in the series, which have been very popular so far. A movie was, at one point or another, in development, but never really came to fruition. Interestingly enough, a report by This hashtag show earlier this year reported that Netflix was in talks for an animated series based on the games. Did it fall into the water? Or did Amazon step in instead? In any case, this will deserve special attention in the weeks / months to come.

We’ll be sure to keep you posted on any new developments on Amazon’s possible “Mass Effect” series.


]]>
Roger McNamee Says Facebook Executives Deserve Criminal Charges And Jail https://000111.info/roger-mcnamee-says-facebook-executives-deserve-criminal-charges-and-jail/ https://000111.info/roger-mcnamee-says-facebook-executives-deserve-criminal-charges-and-jail/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 11:00:26 +0000 https://000111.info/roger-mcnamee-says-facebook-executives-deserve-criminal-charges-and-jail/ Longtime Facebook investor Roger McNamee called for criminal investigations into the company at the Web Summit. His call, echoed by others, shows that the tech world is in open revolt against its main platforms. Nick Clegg, vice president of global affairs at Meta, defended Facebook at the conference. Loading Something is loading. When longtime Facebook […]]]>


  • Longtime Facebook investor Roger McNamee called for criminal investigations into the company at the Web Summit.
  • His call, echoed by others, shows that the tech world is in open revolt against its main platforms.
  • Nick Clegg, vice president of global affairs at Meta, defended Facebook at the conference.

When longtime Facebook investor Roger McNamee took the stage and called for six different Facebook criminal investigations and jail time for any leader found responsible, it became clear that this year’s Web Summit would be different. from previous iterations of the annual Lisbon Technology Conference. .

Normally, Web Summit is a largely apolitical gathering of tech startup founders, software nerds, hackers, and venture capitalists who want to give them money.

The conference is huge – 80,000 people in some years – and it spans four days along the coast of the Portuguese capital. Usually the gossip is about initial public offerings, ‘scaling up’, reviews and ‘exits’.

Not this time. The tech world is now in open revolt against its own big platforms. This year, Facebook is the # 1 public enemy. Social networks are now the devil. Much of the discussion among the attendees revolves around how to kill social media, regulate Google, or get around them both.

The conference was officially opened by Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen, who told the audience of 20,000 people at the center of the stage that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg should step down.

“They were putting lives at risk… Facebook is currently prioritizing content in the news feed, which has the side effect of prioritizing and amplifying the most extreme and controversial content,” she said. declared.

She cited Ethiopia as an example. He is currently undergoing a civil war that could overthrow his government.

The “weakest” countries do not have artificially smart moderation capable of automatically removing toxic content, as Facebook prioritizes English and its American users over everyone else, she said. .

In Ethiopia, “where ethnic violence is currently taking place,” there are 100 million people who speak six languages ​​and 95 dialects. Moderation of content “does not adapt to the most fragile places in the world”.

The participants gave him a huge round of applause.

The next day, McNamee had a fireside chat with Guardian reporter Jane Martinson in front of an audience of around 1,000. McNamee has been complaining about Facebook for years, of course.

But Haugen’s leak of thousands of internal Facebook documents to the Wall Street Journal and other news outlets gave McNamee a new moment in the limelight. McNamee’s Elevation Partners invested $ 210 million in Facebook before its IPO in 2011. McNamee didn’t start selling its stake until 2019, according to the New Yorker.

Between these two periods, Facebook’s value roughly quadrupled. At one point, he was Zuckerberg’s mentor.

“I think there are at least six areas where criminal investigations are warranted,” he told the public:

  • The United States Securities and Exchange Commission should investigate Facebook’s failure to disclose information about its activities.
  • Facebook allowed human trafficking on its platform and was “paid to make it happen”
  • Facebook management was “complicit” in the “Stop the Steal” campaign that led to the January 6 insurgency on Capitol Hill.
  • The company is under investigation by the Texas state attorney general over whether Facebook has worked with Google to set prices. “The standard sentence for this is three and a half years in prison for all executives and this is the most egregious case of price fixing in the United States in decades,” he blasted.
  • (McNamee did not give details of the other two investigations he said are warranted.)

These speeches were not isolated incidents.

Before McNamee spoke, football legend Thierry Henry told the public he abandoned all of his social media accounts earlier this year because he was tired of the racist abuse he received from them. “When you find out that they generate money out of hate, it’s very difficult when your medicine is your poison,” he said.

And in a conversation with Insider, DJ Sam Feldt – who is also the founder of Fangage, a promotional software platform for artists and musicians – said one of his main motivations for starting the business was his growing distance from Facebook.

“At one point I had a million subscribers, but I also realized that the more subscribers I had, the fewer people I reached because of the algorithms. So my reach is restricted by Mark Zuckerberg in Silicon Valley… I would assume if you have a million followers on your Facebook page, the number of people you reach increases.

“But no, basically right now it’s around 2%,” he said. “I’m sick of social media, which limits the way I can chat with my friends.”

a photo of DJ Sam Feldt the founder of Fangage

DJ Sam Feldt, the founder of Fangage.

Tedding


In the olden days – before the pandemic – visitors to the Web Summit used the word ‘disruption’ to describe how they wanted their apps and coding to replace physical industries (think Airbnb vs. hotel chains) or old treasury companies ( Uber versus taxis).

This year, in conversations with half a dozen conference attendees, the same theme came up over and over again: How to Disrupt Facebook and Google. Or abandon them, or undermine them, or avoid them, or block them, or otherwise replace their businesses with more ethical software.

Sridhar Ramaswamy, the former senior vice president of advertising and commerce at Google, told Insider in late 2017 when he realized he wanted to step down after 15 years there. A tabloid newspaper had published a headline accusing YouTube of having broadcast advertisements against child pornography.

“There was a lot of horrible content on YouTube and there were ads running against the horrible content. I remember the day,” he said. “I was like, ‘I’m so done with this job.'”

He was careful to add that he didn’t believe the tabloid story was accurate. However, he was fed up with defending Google: “You want to have dignity in your job,” he said.

head photo of Sridhar Ramaswamy, the former senior vice president of advertising and commerce at Google

Sridhar Ramaswamy, former senior vice president of advertising and commerce at Google.

Neeva


Ramaswamy is now the co-founder and CEO of Neeva, a subscription-only search engine that offers a more private, ad-free service through quality rankings, not engagement.

Commitment is the problem, not the solution, he said. Engagement-based ecosystems reward the worst players on any platform because their horrible behavior gets the most attention. “It is this combination of the relentless pursuit of attention that the advertising model has produced. An endless quest for more time and more attention.”

In a quiet behind-the-scenes conversation after his speech, McNamee told Insider that engagement coupled with anonymity were the two main poisons emitted by social media.

“Historically, anonymity has given trolls enormous power in relation to their numbers… [and yet] you can target them perfectly [with ads]. And then you create economic incentives for the more emotionally extreme voices, right? “

Nick Clegg, former British Deputy Prime Minister and now vice president of global affairs for Facebook’s parent company, Meta, appeared at the conference via a video screen in defense of the company.

Facebook didn’t want hate propaganda on its platform any more than anyone else, he said. “The people who pay to generate these ads – the advertisers – don’t want this content next to us.… Users won’t continue to use our products if they have a bad experience.”

Nick Clegg at the Web Summit

Meta Vice President for Global Affairs Nick Clegg seen speaking at the Web Summit in Lisbon, Portugal.

Jim Edwards / Insider


“For every 10,000 bits of content you see on the News Feed, only five will be hate speech,” Clegg said.

Haugen, speaking earlier, agreed that only a small number of people on Facebook are at the root of most “integrity issues.” But that doesn’t mean these issues are minimal, she said, as their commitment is higher than everyone’s.

“Engagement based ranking is dangerous because right now the most extreme content trumps this run. It’s like the viral variant factors and which are going to be the most extreme.” and the most polarizing are the ones that get the most audiences. “


]]>
https://000111.info/roger-mcnamee-says-facebook-executives-deserve-criminal-charges-and-jail/feed/ 0
Here is the inner workings of the accuracy of the YouTube recommendation engine. https://000111.info/here-is-the-inner-workings-of-the-accuracy-of-the-youtube-recommendation-engine/ https://000111.info/here-is-the-inner-workings-of-the-accuracy-of-the-youtube-recommendation-engine/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 13:51:00 +0000 https://000111.info/here-is-the-inner-workings-of-the-accuracy-of-the-youtube-recommendation-engine/ How many times have you found new or interesting content by clicking recommended videos on YouTube? The recommendations may or may not have a majority vote of users, but a lot of thought has gone into developing the algorithm that makes those suggestions to users, a senior executive said on Wednesday. Reiterating how recommendations play […]]]>


How many times have you found new or interesting content by clicking recommended videos on YouTube? The recommendations may or may not have a majority vote of users, but a lot of thought has gone into developing the algorithm that makes those suggestions to users, a senior executive said on Wednesday.

Reiterating how recommendations play an important role in maintaining a responsible platform, YouTube today shared information on how its recommendation engine works.

“Recommendations today generate a significant portion of the overall YouTube audience, even more than channel subscriptions or search. And we think about it responsibly. Our goal is to help viewers access high quality information while minimizing the chances of them seeing problematic content. Our goal is to have limit content views from recommendations below 0.5% of overall views on YouTube. Said Cristos Goodrow, vice president, Engineering, YouTube.

Unlike other platforms, YouTube does not connect viewers to content through their social network. This basically means that unlike Facebook or Instagram, you won’t see any videos on YouTube that your friends or larger social networks are watching.

YouTube’s recommendation philosophy is based on accurately predicting which videos the viewer wants to watch – based on their own interests and preferences, not who they are connected with.

YouTube has built recommendations on the simple premise of helping people find the videos they want to watch that will make them valuable. Viewers find them at work in two places: the ‘home page’, which appears when you first open YouTube, displaying a mix of personalized recommendations, subscriptions, and the latest news and information. and the “To be continued” panel, which appears when watching a video, providing subsequent content suggestions based on the current video.

Additionally, viewers have controls to manage what they want to share and how much they want to share in order to get a personalized experience on YouTube. For example, viewers who do not want personalized recommendations can choose to delete the history of watched videos.

However, there has been criticism of how recommendations work on YouTube. Earlier this year, a study released by Mozilla found that YouTube’s artificial intelligence engine recommends content that users regret watching, increasing views and serving more ads.

With people using YouTube not only for entertainment but also for news and information, the platform used recommendations to reduce low-quality content from being viewed widely, Goodrow said. He built classifiers to identify and prevent recommendation of racy / violent videos, started downgrading sensationalist content, removed any video showing minors in risky situations, and further expanded how the recommendation system is used. to reduce problematic misinformation and borderline content.

Dear reader,

Business Standard has always strived to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that matter to you and have broader political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering has only strengthened our resolve and commitment to these ideals. Even in these difficult times resulting from Covid-19, we remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and cutting edge commentary on relevant current issues.
However, we have a demand.

As we fight the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more so that we can continue to provide you with more quality content. Our subscription model has received an encouraging response from many of you who have subscribed to our online content. More subscriptions to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of providing you with even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practice the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital editor


]]>
https://000111.info/here-is-the-inner-workings-of-the-accuracy-of-the-youtube-recommendation-engine/feed/ 0