DOJ investigates Instagram’s impact on young adults

Social media is in the national spotlight right now. In Wisconsin, Attorney General Josh Kaul is part of the team investigating Instagram’s impact on young people, including mental health. After spending some time at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, some students say they find themselves scrolling for a while. “I probably check Instagram about 25 times a day,” said sophomore Marika Marsh. She said that while scrolling, she feels a little anxious. “Especially with the girls today, because everyone looks so perfect all the time and it makes you feel insecure,” she said. Marsh even took a break from social media deleting Instagram.”It was impacting my work life, my social life just by constantly comparing,” she said.Alejandra Gonzalez and her friends told WISN 12 News they were skeptical about what ‘they were seeing on social media the best part of their day,” Gonzalez said. “I don’t like to get involved because I know most people are faking their lives,” said Florencio, a fellow student. “In reality, their days could be just as boring as ours. I think it’s more of an image that they try to paint themselves,” Alejandro said. Psychiatrist Dr Elizabeth Hamlin said social media is a hand-picked version of reality. “Social media offers a really distorted worldview of people’s daily lives,” she said. “Often the best experiences or the most exciting experiences.”Dr. Steven Dykstra, director of behavioral health for Milwaukee County, said that lifestyle isn’t healthy for young adults. “Too many kids are doing this instead of traditional, genuine relationships and it’s getting dangerous,” he said. “Social media platforms identify young girls who click on information suggesting they feel bad about their appearance and they don’t flood them with resources, helping them feel better.” The influence of social media on young adults has reached the Wisconsin Department of Justice. Kaul is now part of a nationwide survey of Instagram’s impact. “Evidence was provided to Congress that Facebook knew Instagram was causing harm to children and young adults, but it was not providing this information to the public,” Kaul said. “I’m confident we’re going to get the answers we need to judge whether Facebook should be held responsible for this.” Students said the pressure to have a catchy stream is demanding. “There’s a huge image to uphold for social media platforms and it’s strong in our generation,” one UWM student said of Instagram’s impact on her friends. to edit this to brighten my eyes, it will look prettier, it’s all about angles and perspective.” If you or someone you know is in need of mental health resources, Milwaukee County has crisis teams who answer the phone on 4/27. They do house calls and there is even an emergency room for people who need immediate care no matter how serious the case. Wrap Around Milwaukee is also an option.

Social media is in the national spotlight right now.

In Wisconsin, Attorney General Josh Kaul is part of the team investigating Instagram’s impact on young people, including mental health.

After spending some time at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, some students say they find themselves scrolling for a while.

“I probably check Instagram about 25 times a day,” sophomore Marika Marsh said.

She said that while she paraded, she felt a little anxious.

“Especially with girls today, because everyone looks so perfect all the time and it makes you feel uneasy,” she said.

Marsh even took a break from social media by deleting Instagram.

“It was impacting my work life, my social life just with constant comparisons,” she said.

Alejandra Gonzalez and her friends told WISN 12 News they were skeptical of what they were seeing on social media

“I feel like people are making their lives fun by posting the best part of their day,” Gonzalez said.

“I don’t like getting involved because I know most people are faking their lives,” said Florencio, another student.

“In reality, their days could be just as boring as ours. I think it’s more of an image that they try to give themselves,” Alejandro said.

Psychiatrist Dr Elizabeth Hamlin said social media is a hand-picked version of reality.

“Social media offers a really distorted worldview of people’s daily lives,” she said. “Often the best experiences or the most exciting experiences.”

Dr. Steven Dykstra, director of behavioral health for Milwaukee County, said that lifestyle is not healthy for young adults.

“Too many kids are doing this instead of traditional, genuine relationships and it’s getting dangerous,” he said. “Social media platforms identify young girls who click on information suggesting they feel bad about their appearance and they don’t flood them with resources, helping them feel better.”

The influence of social media on young adults has reached the Wisconsin Department of Justice. Kaul is now part of a nationwide survey of Instagram’s impact.

“There was evidence provided to Congress that Facebook knew Instagram was causing harm to children and young adults, but it was not providing that information to the public,” Kaul said. “I’m confident we’ll get the answers we need to judge whether Facebook should be held responsible for this.”

Students said the pressure to have a catchy stream is demanding.

“There’s a huge image to uphold for social media platforms and it’s strong in our generation,” a UWM student said of Instagram’s impact on her friends. “A lot of times I find myself editing this to brighten my eyes, it will look prettier, it’s all about angles and perspective.”

If you or someone you know needs mental health resources, Milwaukee County has crisis teams that answer the phone 27/4. They do house calls and there is even an emergency room for people who need immediate care, no matter how serious the case.

Wrap Around Milwaukee is also an option.

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